as sweet as vinegar

I'll break them down, no mercy shown

hollyhocksandtulips:

During the wartime nylon ration in the 1940s, women had their legs painted to resemble stockings.

hollyhocksandtulips:

During the wartime nylon ration in the 1940s, women had their legs painted to resemble stockings.

(via hunters-hollow)

hunters-hollow:

nextyearsgirl:

The absence of women in history is man made.


WHATI’M SO ANGRY

hunters-hollow:

nextyearsgirl:

The absence of women in history is man made.

WHAT

I’M SO ANGRY

(Source: starbuckara, via toothoulouse)

I am a millennial. Generation Y. Born between the birth of AIDS and 9/11, give or take. They call us the “Global Generation.” We are known for our entitlement and narcissism. Some say it’s because we’re the first generation where every kid gets a trophy just for showing up. Others think it’s because social media allows us to post every time we fart or have a sandwich for all the world to see. But it seems that our one defining trait is the numbness to the world—an indifference to suffering.

(Source: americanhorrorgifs, via allycaat)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Janine Rewell for Minna Parikka

Bodypaint SS14

Art direction, illustration and body paint design

for MINNA PARIKKA SS14 collaboration.
Photography by Jonas Lundqvist 
Bodypaint by Saara Sarvas & Riina Laine 
2014 / Minna Parikka

(via bloomfemme)

red-lipstick:

G Steel aka Fat Steel Panda (UK) - Jellyfish, 2010      Photography

red-lipstick:

G Steel aka Fat Steel Panda (UK) - Jellyfish, 2010      Photography

(Source: Flickr / arkangel8514, via bloomfemme)

style-racks:

RIH

style-racks:

RIH

(Source: vickynspiration, via bloomfemme)

jtotheizzoe:

Are These Cave Paintings The First Animations?
Over at Nautilus, Zach Zorich illuminates how 21,000 year-old cave paintings at Lascaux may represent an early form of motion picture.
Many of the superimposed animal shapes, like the deer heads above (photo by Norbert Aujoulet), can appear to move like a flip-book when they are viewed with the dim, flickering light sources that would have been available to Paleolithic humans. Combine it with some low-light trickery on behalf of the visual system, and you’ve got cave-toons:

Physiologically, our eyes undergo a switch when we slip into darkness. In bright light, eyes primarily rely on the color-sensitive cells in our retinas called cones, but in low light the cones don’t have enough photons to work with and cells that sense black and white gradients, called rods, take over. That’s why in low light, colors fade, shadows become harder to distinguish from actual objects, and the soft boundaries between things disappear. Images straight ahead of us look out of focus, as if they were seen in our peripheral vision. The end result for early humans who viewed cave paintings by firelight might have been that a deer with multiple heads, for example, resembled a single, animated beast.

Storytelling, visual or otherwise, is simply part of what makes human.
Previously: Archaeologist Marc Azema has found similar story-paintings at Chauvet, even older than Lascaux!
(via Nautilus)

jtotheizzoe:

Are These Cave Paintings The First Animations?

Over at Nautilus, Zach Zorich illuminates how 21,000 year-old cave paintings at Lascaux may represent an early form of motion picture.

Many of the superimposed animal shapes, like the deer heads above (photo by Norbert Aujoulet), can appear to move like a flip-book when they are viewed with the dim, flickering light sources that would have been available to Paleolithic humans. Combine it with some low-light trickery on behalf of the visual system, and you’ve got cave-toons:

Physiologically, our eyes undergo a switch when we slip into darkness. In bright light, eyes primarily rely on the color-sensitive cells in our retinas called cones, but in low light the cones don’t have enough photons to work with and cells that sense black and white gradients, called rods, take over. That’s why in low light, colors fade, shadows become harder to distinguish from actual objects, and the soft boundaries between things disappear. Images straight ahead of us look out of focus, as if they were seen in our peripheral vision. The end result for early humans who viewed cave paintings by firelight might have been that a deer with multiple heads, for example, resembled a single, animated beast.

Storytelling, visual or otherwise, is simply part of what makes human.

Previously: Archaeologist Marc Azema has found similar story-paintings at Chauvet, even older than Lascaux!

(via Nautilus)

(via sirfunk)

malformalady:

Robert Smithson’s iconic earthwork, Spiral Jetty, takes the form of a 1,500-foot-long and approximately 15-foot-wide coil of basalt rocks that extends into Utah’s Great Salt Lake, near Rozel Point. Smithson was one of a number of artists in the late 1960s and 1970s who moved out into the vast, open landscapes of the American West, putting the earth itself to use as an artistic medium. He chose the lake as the site of his monumental sculpture because he was drawn to the reddish hue of the water, caused by microorganisms that thrive in the highly saline environment.

malformalady:

Robert Smithson’s iconic earthwork, Spiral Jetty, takes the form of a 1,500-foot-long and approximately 15-foot-wide coil of basalt rocks that extends into Utah’s Great Salt Lake, near Rozel Point. Smithson was one of a number of artists in the late 1960s and 1970s who moved out into the vast, open landscapes of the American West, putting the earth itself to use as an artistic medium. He chose the lake as the site of his monumental sculpture because he was drawn to the reddish hue of the water, caused by microorganisms that thrive in the highly saline environment.

(via bloomfemme)